Department

Biochemistry

Preferred Sample Type

Orosomucoid (alpha1-acid glycoprotein)

Suitable Specimen Types

  • Serum
  • Li Hep Plasma
1.0 mL

Sample Processing in Laboratory

Usual

Sample Preparation

Centrifuge and store at -20ºC until analysis.

Turnaround Time

7 days

Sample Stability

- 20ºC

Orosomucoid (alpha1-acid glycoprotein)

General Information

Please note, this test is no longer performed at Birmingham Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. For the assessment of acute and recurring inflammations we recommend measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP)

Alpha1-acid glycoprotein (also known as orosomucoid) is a classical acute phase protein showing a 3-4 fold increase during inflammation or tissue damage. Concentrations of this protein peak 3-5 days after the initiating event. Decreased levels are associated with severe liver disease and protein losing syndromes. Structurally it belongs to the lipocalin superfamily of secretory proteins. The lipocalin protein superfamily is one of exhibits diversity at the level of sequence and function. It consists of more than 25 small extracellular proteins originating from a wide variety of tissues in vertebrate and invertebrate animals, plants and bacteria. Lipocalins are characterised by three molecular recognition properties: the binding of small hydrophobic substances, the binding to cell-surface receptors, and the formation of complexes with other soluble macromolecules. A typical lipocalin consists of a 160-180 amino-acid peptide, folded into 8-9 b-strands which form a coffee filter-like cone with a hydrophobic interior. The plasma proteins: retinol-binding protein, alpha1-acid glycoprotein , and alpha-1 microglobulin, the nasal odorant-binding proteins, the bilin-binding proteins of butterflies and crustacyanin, the protein which gives the shell of crayfish its unusual colour properties, are all examples of lipocalins.

Alpha1-acid glycoprotein promotes fibroblast growth and interacts with collagen. Its main clinical use is in the assessment of acute and recurring inflammations as well as of tumours with cell necrosis. It can be used to differentiate bewteen acute phase reactions (where it is elevated) and oestrogen induced effects (concentrations normal or decreased). Along with haptoglobin, it is a useful marker of slight in vivo haemolysis.

Patient Preparation

None

Notes

Please note, this test is no longer performed at Birmingham Heart of England NHS Foundation Trust. For the assessment of acute and recurring inflammations we recommend measurement of C-reactive protein (CRP)

Reference Range

0.3-1.2 g/L

Copyright heftpathology 2013, 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018

HTA licence number is 12366

Protection of Personal Information – Laboratory Medicine comply with the Trust Data Protection Policy and have procedures in place to allow the Directorate and it’s employees to comply with the Data Protection Act 1998 and associated best practice and guidance.

The Trust Laboratories at Heartlands Hospital, Good Hope Hospital and Solihull Hospital were awarded UKAS (United Kingdom Accreditation Service) accreditation to the internationally recognised ISO 15189 standard in May 2015. For a list of accredited tests and other information please visit the test database http://www.heftpathology.com/frontpage/test-database.html.
Tests not appearing on this scope are either under consideration or in the process of accreditation and so currently remain outside of our scope of accreditation. However, these tests have been validated to the same high standard as accredited tests and are performed by the same trained and competent staff.

For further information contact Louise Fallon, Quality Manager, 0121 424 1235

UKAS Logos